Homeschooling High School: Teenage Homeschoolers
Homeschooling through the teenage/high school years offers several different challenges. You may need to meet specific requirements and you may find that you are teaching subjects with which you are not familiar. In addition, many parents don't begin homeschooling until their child reaches high school age. To help navigate this sometimes new territory, we've put together helpful resources to help both parent and student successfully homeschool during the high school years.
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Math-U-See Users Group
This email group is for lovers and users of the Math-U-See program.
State Education Fails The Test
Children naturally love to learn. They want to know everything. "Daddy, why is the sky blue?" "Why can't I see my back?" "Why are those dogs doing that?" "Are we there yet?" And so on and so on. Then we send them to school. And all desire to learn is methodically destroyed. Many of today's citizens are products of the schools of the last twenty years, during which time the trend has been to adopt a more and more socialistic posture. Most teachers have never spent their lives anywhere except in c...
Catholic Home Study Service
Catholic Home Study Service (CHSS), sponsored by the Vincentian community and the Missouri Knights of Columbus, offers free courses on the Catholic Faith. Six free courses, faithful to the teachings of the Church, are available. When you request a course, you will receive a textbook and a workbook with study questions. After reading a section of the book, you can send your workbook answers to us either over the internet or by postal mail. We will make whatever corrections are necessary and answe...
How to Begin Homeschooling
A good discussion of the common pitfalls new homeschooling parents face: too much structure or not enough structure. Some of these ideas won't work for everyone, but there are some interesting approaches to a balanced homeschooling learning environment.
Waldorf Education: A Family Guide
Waldorf Education finds itself catapulted from its humble beginnings 80 years ago into the midst of the central educational and social issues of this decade.What draws parents and educators toward Waldorf Education today? "Waldorf Education - A Family Guide" offers a "first look" for parents and educators into the history, philosophy, curriculum, and traditions of this unique education. This comprehensive book is a collection of articles describing the world of Waldorf Education - the fastest gr...
And What About College?: How Homeschooling Can Lead to Admissions to the Best Colleges & Universities
And What About College? How homeschooling leads to admissions to the best colleges and universities, Cafi Cohen.The newest edition, completely revised, updated and expanded for 2000-2001. 48 new pages added - same price as before!

*Every chapter substantially revised to refelct recent changes in college admissions policies, testing requirements, and scholarship availability
*New chapter on college at home and on-line college
*New appendix on study tips for the college bound
*Updated resources and web sites
*Chapter highlights to help you focus on the most important points

The Teenage Liberation Handbook: How to Quit School and Get a Real Life and Education
You won't find this book on a school library shelf--it's pure teenage anarchy. While many homeschooling authors hem and haw that learning at home isn't for everyone, this manifesto practically tells kids they're losers if they do otherwise. With the exception of a forwarding note to parents, this book is written entirely for teenagers, and the first 75 pages explain why school is a waste of time. Grace Llewellyn insists that people learn better when they are self-motivated and not confined by school walls. Instead of homeschooling, which connotes setting up a school at home, Llewellyn prefers "unschooling," a learning method with no structure or formal curriculum. There are tips here you won't hear from a school guidance counselor. Llewellyn urges kids to take a vacation--at least for a week--after quitting school to purge its influence. "Throw darts at a picture of your school" or "Make a bonfire of old worksheets," she advises. She spends an entire chapter on the gentle art of persuading parents that this is a good idea. Then she gets serious. Llewellyn urges teens to turn off the TV, get outside, and turn to their local libraries, museums, the Internet, and other resources for information. She devotes many chapters to books and suggestions for teaching yourself science, math, social sciences, English, foreign languages, and the arts. She also includes advice on jobs and getting into college, assuring teens that, contrary to what they've been told in school, they won't be flipping burgers for the rest of their days if they drop out.

Llewellyn is a former middle-school English teacher, and she knows her audience well. Her formula for making the transition from traditional school to unschooling is accompanied by quotes on freedom and free thought from radical thinkers such as Steve Biko and Ralph Waldo Emerson. And Llewellyn is not above using slang. She capitalizes words to add emphasis, as in the "Mainstream American Suburbia-Think" she blames most schools for perpetuating. Some of her attempts to appeal to young minds ring a bit corny. She weaves through several chapters an allegory about a baby whose enthusiasm is squashed by a sterile, unnatural environment, and tells readers to "learn to be a human bean and not a mashed potato." But her underlying theme--think for yourself--should appeal to many teenagers. --Jodi Mailander Farrell

Links
National Merit Scholarship Corporation
Established in 1955, National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC) is an independent, not-for-profit organization that operates without government assistance. NMSC conducts the National Merit® Scholarship Program and the National Achievement® Scholarship Program–annual competitions for recognition and college undergraduate scholarships.
The Princeton Review
Search for schools and careers, find test preparation courses, get information on scholarships, and more.
The College Board
The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 4,700 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves over three and a half million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program®(AP).
Homeschool Diploma
Homeschool Diploma offers complete graduation supplies for the graduating homeschooler. They carry diplomas, covers, announcements and invitations, caps, gowns, tassels, gifts, and more.
Homeschooling a 17-year-old for the First Time
Isabel Shaw answers a question from a mom considering homeschooling her teenager.
Support
FuseFly
FuseFly is a social network connecting homeschoolers around the world. This innovative site gives homeschoolers the opportunity to socialize with other homeschoolers, while offering a secure environment for teens age thirteen and up and areas for both students and parents.
Homeschooling Older Kids
Homeschooling Older Kids is a part of Eclectic Home Educators that is dedicated to homeschooling children ages 11 and up.
Articles
Home-Schooled Students and College Board Standardized Testing
A letter from Peter Negroni, Vice President, Teaching and Learning, of the College Board, addressing the procedure for students to take the PSAT/NMSQT, AP, or any other secure College Board tests.
Ungraduation
One mother's reminiscences about her son's high school years as an unschooler, and his transition to college.
Unschooling High School and College
Alison McKee began unschooling her two children over twenty years ago and from their family's experiences wrote the book "From Homeschool to College and Work: Turning Your Homeschooled Experiences into College and Job Portfolios." In this Frequently Asked Questions list, she discusses unschooling through high school and how this works when your child wants to head off to college.
Commentary: A Day in the Life of a Homeschool High School Student
"What do you do all day?" "Do you get to sleep in every day?" "Do you ever see anybody besides your family?" "Do you do your schoolwork in your pajamas?" "Do you even do schoolwork when you don't feel like it?" These are some of the questions I have been asked several times. So, to answer some of these, and others, I kept a journal of one day for me and my five siblings, which will hopefully give readers a better idea of what it is like to be a homeschooling high school student.
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